Download the minube app
and travel like never before
Download
Where'd you like to go?
Do you like Tunisia?
Share it with the world!
Enter with Google +

Streets in Tunisia

18 streets in Tunisia

Streets in Susah
Streets of Sousse
(1)
The streets of Sousse it's a good place for tourists to learn about islam
Streets in Qibili
Tozeur to Kebili Road
(2)
The road between Tozeur and Kebili, situated to the southwest of Tunisia across the huge salt lake Chott El Djerid, the largest in Africa. Apart from the obvious attractions that go hand in hand with a very special landscape, I could not help noticing the curious places along the way. They are always located close together (remember we are on the edge of the desert), shops that sell the famous desert roses, black sand or just a bottle of water. What is definitely strange, there is no doubt about it, are the signs in Spanish that are scattered everywhere "cheaper than Carrefour", "cheaper than the whole one hundred" ... Even Tunisian posters flaunt their good humor and tireless spirit of sellers and merchants.
Streets in Tunis
Rue Jamaa Ezzitouna
(2)
Zaytuna Zamaa Street, along with rue de la Kasbah , is one of the most important streets in the Medina. It's lined with souvenir shops, although you can find the same things but much cheaper in the back streets. The road rises steeply from the Place de la Victoire to the Great Zaitouna Mosque. The whole area is a very busy and crowded. You can find shops selling Nabeul pottery, handmade talismans from Fatima, cages, stuffed camels, and more. The vendors speak virtually any language (they say: "hello ... Spanish? ... Italian? .. as you walk by). At the top of the street, there are several typical pastry shopes and Café Ez- Zaytuna, where you can have a mint tea and smoke a hookah. At the end of the street, you can see the eastern gallery of the Great Mosque which is lit up at night. From here, turn right, and you'll find the carpet store " Au Palais d'orient ", which I'd suggest entering only to climb to the roof and enjoy the good view of the mosque courtyard and the rooftops and minarets of the medina.
Streets in Tunis
Avenue Habib Bourguiba
(2)
The Avenue Habib Bourguiba, aside from being one of the longest streets in Tunis, is also one of the most popular. It's lined with cafes, stores, modern hotels, and colonial-style buildings, which is why it's popularly known as the Champs Elysees of Tunisia. Personally, I was really impressed by the colonial buildings, a striking contrast with the old Arab buildings.
Streets in Susah
Habib Bourguiba Avenue, Sousse
Habib Bourguiba Avenue is one of the most important streets to be found in the city of Sousse, and it is also where you will find the majority of the Sousse promenade, which overlooks the Mediterranean Sea. In my opinion, the most important thing about this avenue is its fantastic location, going right along the [poi = 154322] Sousse beach [/ poi] and creating the city´s promenade. This avenue meets Avenue Hedi Chaker and joins both the avenues together to form one of the most important avenues in the city of Sousse. They are important in terms of tourism demand as they take up the majority of Sousse´s beach.
Streets in Sidi Bou Said
Habib Thameur Street
Thameur Habib Street is the principe shopping street on the shore of the town of Sidi Bou Said, one of my favorites on my trip in 2007. Here you can find all kinds of souvenirs and typical shops, and of course you need to practice the best and most popular art in Tunisia, which is bartering and haggling. Most souvenirs are hand made by its vendors. Personally I liked the bird cages which were impressive. I think they are all rated depending to the work of the craftsman himself.
Streets in Monastir
Promenade of Monastir (La Corniche)
It was a sunny day, so I left the hotel and headed to the coast to see the sea. Monastir has a beautiful seaside promenade known as the Corniche that runs high along the beach until the old port. It's a wide avenue lined with palm trees that has spectacular views of the Mediterranean, as well as the island of El-Kebira, which has now been joined to the mainland.
Streets in Monastir
Avenue Habib Bourguiba
The Avenue Habib Bourguiba is one of the most important streets in Monastir. It's lined with very large hotels, restaurants and cafes, post offices, banks, and the Bab Briqcha leading to the Medina. A few steps away is the railway station and an Internet cafe. The street is named after the former President of the Republic, Habib Bourguiba.
Streets in Monastir
Cap Monastir
At the end of the promenade, there's an old port in the luxurious urbanization of Cap Monastir. The houses are small apartment chalets that are well maintained (some sported the sign "sold"), with whitewashed walls that make the windows stand out and turquoise railings (as in Sidi Bou Said). There's a Marbella-style beautiful marina and a promenade on the seafront that's full of bars and restaurants. The area's upmarket and high priced but it's very nice to go for a walk and drink or eat on the terraces.
Streets in Tozeur
Habib Bourguiba Avenue
Habib Bourguiba Avenue is the main street of Tozeur, through the city from north to south between Avenue Abdulkacem Chebbi and the Place Bab el-Hawa (where the tourist office can be found). The street is not very long (about 250 meters), but very busy since there is where all the main shops in the city are, and the mosque el-Ferdous , bank, and several cafes and restaurants. There is great entertainment throughout the day. The intersections that arise on both banks of the avenue are ancient, narrow streets, on the east side is the Place Ibn Chabbat (main) and central market , from which you access the Medina.
Streets in Carthage
Roads - Urban Layout of Carthage Ancient
Carthage was one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world. All that is left today are a few ruins. The Phoenicians founded it in 814 BC. During the 4th century BC it was the thriving metropolis of this part of the Mediterranean. The city was destroyed during the Punic Wars, but again revived under the Roman Empire. Behind followed the Vandals, Byzantines and Arabs, who laid it to ruin in 695. The city sits on the Byrsa Hill that rises in a dominant position on the Mediterranean, where you find the Punic ports. The ruins we see today are mainly from Roman times: The Roman circus, amphitheater, theater, acropolis, Roman villas and baths of Antoninus. The ancient Carthage is, therefore, the urban layout design typical of Roman cities. Its roads, called "viae vicinalis" had a width of between 3 - 7 meters and made of pebbles mixed with sand. The main street linked the hill to the sea. Every 10 meters there was a "military stone", cylindrically shaped milestones expressed in Roman miles, the distance between that point and the nearby towns, major road junctions or borders.
Streets in Tunis
(2)
Streets in Tunis
(1)
Streets in Tunis
(1)
Streets in Al-Qayrawan
Ville Nouvelle de Kairouán
Outside the Walls of the [poi = 153191] medina [/ poi] (just south of it) you can find the new area of ​​the city of Kairouan, which, like that of Tunisia, is known as the Ville Nouvelle, because of the Art Deco style of the buildings. The busiest area of ​​the city is located around the Place des Martyrs (directly opposite the [poi = 156881] Bab ech-Chouhada gate [/ poi] of [poi = 153202] [/ poi]) and its surrounding streets (Avenue Habib Bourguiba, Av and Av Republique From Hamda Laaouant). Here is where you will find tha majority of the hotels, restaurants, terraces and cafes, which get very lively in the evening. At the Martyrs Square, you can find the [b] tourist information office [/ b], and continuing through Av Habib Bourguiba are the House of Culture and the City.
Streets in Susah
Streets in Sidi Bou Said
Streets in Tunis